Analysis by the father of American Geopolitics Dr. Daniel Fine, MIT.

Posts tagged ‘EnergyIndustry’

Energy expert: New Mexico oil production has lessened potential for war


A must read! -> 2/11/2019 Hobbs News Sun | Sunday, February 10, 2019 | 7
Energy expert: New Mexico oil production has
lessened potential for war
CURTIS C. WYNNE NEWS-SUN

County ranks third in the nation in oil production.

Lea and Eddy counties have made history by reducing the possibility of a

Middle Eastern war for oil, according to Daniel Fine, a research and

development energy expert at New Mexico Tech.

Why? Because oil and gas production eliminates this nation’s need to rely on

the Middle East for fossil fuel.

Having served in developing former Gov. Susana Martinez’s energy policy and

in the Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department, Fine said he’s

currently writing an energy paper for a Washington, D.C. think tank.

“What has happened now, with President Trump’s policies and the

(Department of) Interior policies under (David) Bernhardt, is the chance of the

United States getting into a Middle East war to protect its interests in oil supply

and imports has evaporated, finished,” Fine said.

He dated the potential for war in the Middle East over oil as early as the 1970s.

“We have almost 50 years of tension and potential military participation in the

Middle East to provide us with imported oil from there,” Fine said. “The two

counties in New Mexico have eliminated this and have now played an important

role in peacemaking…” See the link below->

Hobbs News Sun _ Sunday, February 10, 2019 _ 7

Reactions to Delaware Basin news shows misunderstanding of petroleum economics by Dr. Daniel Fine


The article is here-> https://www.daily-times.com/story/money/industries/oil-gas/2018/12/18/delaware-basin-news-reveals-public-misunderstanding-oil-industry-economics/2282224002/

News of the size of oil reserves in the Delaware Basin (New Mexico’s share of the Permian) while OPEC was deciding how many barrels it will cut from the world market to lift prices caused epic confusion – and revelations of how little “authorities” and the media understand petroleum economics.

The New Mexico media, which relies mainly on interviews with petroleum industry spokespersons, got it wrong.

Government numbers came out as 46 billion barrels (Permian total) with 26 in New Mexico. This means nothing but oil in good rock along with technical recovery as an estimate. Some excited “authorities,” who should know better, exclaimed that there was more.

However, the estimate is based on the application of technical means to recover the oil. The reserves of real oil depend on ultimate economic recovery. This means technical based on geology, plus economics. A high price will recover the billions of barrels while a low price will not.

In short, the numbers reflect the rocks without economics.

The Delaware reserves plus the Texas Permian are now there to expand supply over 12 million b/d in the United States.

This writer has warned that world oil demand is sluggish and imprecise with only references to legacy guesswork that the developing world plus China demand will support prices long term or forever. Yet, world oil consumption has increased only 5 percent in the last 10 years.

OPEC, with Saudi Arabia as its leader, has expired as the world administrator of the price of crude oil. At its December meeting in Austria, Qatar quit after nearly 70 years and announced concentration in LNG production and world export as the existing market leader.

OPEC emerged with a serious factional split between OPEC original and OPEC with Russia. There would have been no agreement without Russia and its old Russian Federation members as producers. Moscow is the new world oil price-setter indirectly while OPEC Original becomes a collaborator in cartel for now. Simply put, Saudi Arabia no longer is the “residual supplier” alone.

The production roll-back of 1.2 barrels per day by both “OPEC” is not enough for “balance” supply and demand for world crude oil.  It is being tested daily by commodity traders. In a briefing to New Mexico independent and small producers before the meeting in Austria, this writer warned that 1.7 million b/d was needed for balancing stabilization. Without that size of a production and export reduction, the average price of WTI oil in 2019 will average $50 per barrel.

Nearing 12 million b/d and over the Permian producers voluntarily will be required by this price to revise capital spending and place production into DUC (non-completions) and storage. There is doubt that the export of tight or shale oil would continue if the Brent price falls lower and loses its premium over WTI. A net cutback of Permian between 500,000 to 750,00 b/d should be a non-OPEC response to an oil glut even more serious than 2014.

Saudi Arabia is untouched as an American strategic ally in confronting Iran in the Middle East as a hegemonic threat.

Despite some Republicans and the Democratic Party in Congress, violation of human rights over the death of a Saudi journalist and critic of the Crown Prince will not override U.S. national interests in the Middle East.

President Trump has not deviated from post—World War Two foreign and defense policy.

Trump wants low oil prices for American consumers and forced OPEC this summer to pump more to offset export sanctions on Iran.

Still, with OPEC under a deep division which no President could achieve since 1973, Trump as a geopolitical manager of world oil has removed about 500,000 b/d between January and December of 2018. America, via Trump and without a formal cartel alignment, determines much of the price of world oil.

The United States and its Southwest tight and shale oil has changed from dependence on world oil to domination. Never again can OPEC engage the U.S. in a price and market share war as it did in 2014-2016 through supply acceleration in an oversupplied world market.

WTI emerges as the new world price. It is American barrels that set the price and OPEC is a price-taker. Since there are nearly 50 billion barrels in reserve in New Mexico, how will the Permian producers set a return on investment in a free market for petroleum?

Dr. Daniel Fine is the associate director of New Mexico Tech’s Center for Energy Policy and the State of New Mexico Natural Gas Export Coordinator. The opinions expressed are his own.

Link

No end in sight for NM’s oil boom


No end in sight for NM’s oil boom

A pumpjack operates near Carlsbad. New Mexico's oil production jumped 17 percent in 2013, with more growth projected this year. (Courtesy of NMOGA)

Copyright © 2014 Albuquerque Journal

The oil boom in southeast New Mexico just keeps growing, and there’s no end in sight.

Oil production jumped by another 17 percent in 2013, according to the latest statistics from the state Oil Conservation Division. That puts New Mexico production back to 1973 levels.

And, this year, experts project another 18 to 20 percent increase.

“Déjà vu,” said Daniel Fine, associate director of the Center for Energy Policy at the New Mexico Institute for Mining and Technology in Socorro. “We’re now back in the early 1970s, which was a period of energy self-sufficiency and independence. It’s a remarkable energy revolution.”

Output reached 99.1 million barrels last year, up from 85.1 million in 2012 and 71.3 million the year before. That represents two straight years of double-digit growth that has pushed production up 39 percent since 2011.

a01_jd_10may_oilOverall, oil output has grown 67 percent since 2008, when the state first began to reverse a three-decade decline that had begun in the early 1970s.

This year, the Center for Energy Policy expects production to expand to between 117 and 119 million barrels.

“We’re at about 270,000 barrels per day now, but we project that to reach between 320,000 and 325,000 per day in 2014,” Fine said. “That would give us the equivalent of about two-thirds of all the oil production in Alaska. In just a few years, we’ll be back at our all-time peak of 129 million barrels, which was achieved in 1969.”

The industry’s newfound fortune comes from modern drilling techniques, including three-dimensional imaging to pinpoint pools of oil and natural gas that producers ignored in the past, hydraulic fracturing to bust open extremely tough shale rock formations and horizontal drilling to push sideways into hydrocarbon deposits.

Those techniques have opened up vast new oil and gas plays around the country, while giving new life to aging basins, such as the Permian in West Texas and Southeast New Mexico, where production originally dates back to the 1920s.

Horizontal drilling in particular has allowed producers to slice into layers of shale bed, where huge pockets of liquids and dry gas are trapped.

“That’s made a huge difference,” said New Mexico Tech geologist Ron Broadhead. “More than half the active wells in New Mexico have been drilled horizontally. About 40 percent of the state’s production is due to that.”

Thanks to the new technologies, the Permian Basin is now estimated to contain some of the largest underground deposits of oil in the world, Fine said.

That’s good news for New Mexico, where royalties and taxes on oil and gas production account for about 31 percent of the state’s general budget, according to a new study released in January by the New Mexico Tax Research Institute. Last year, that amounted to $1.7 billion of the state’s $5.5 billion general fund.

Still, sustaining industry momentum depends on a number of things, especially adequate infrastructure. Road repair, construction of new pipelines and refineries, and more housing for workers are all critical.

“Oil production in New Mexico is no longer a drilling issue;it’s a matter of infrastructure development,” Fine said. “We need to work on that or it will begin to affect production.” For the complete story use this link–> http://www.abqjournal.com/397859/news/no-end-in-sight-for-nms-oil-boom.html

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