Analysis by the father of American Geopolitics Dr. Daniel Fine, MIT.

Posts tagged ‘OilandGas’

New Mexico Energy Outlook Summit 2015 with Keynote leading energy expert Dr. Daniel Fine: Join us!


Join Albuquerque Business First for the 2nd Annual New Mexico Energy Outlook Summit. This Summit will offer business leaders unique access to energy insights that will affect your company in the year to come.

  • When: Thursday, November 12, 2015,7:30am-9:30am Add to my calendar
  • Where: Sandia Resort & Casino: Ballrooms A&BAlbuquerque NM
  • To register use this link–> http://www.bizjournals.com/albuquerque/event/115971#eventDetails
  • Sponsors

    Presenting Sponsor
    Supporting Sponsor
    Event Partner
    For more information on how your company can sponsor one of our events, please contact Tamra Fenstermaker at tfenstermaker@bizjournals.com or 505-348-8326.

    Event Information

    The second annual New Mexico Energy Outlook will offer business leaders unique access to energy insights that will affect your company in the year to come. Beginning with a keynote by Dr. Daniel Fine, this session will focus on how the evolving landscape of the energy industry and the world’s demand for energy will affect our state and economy. The 30-minute presentation will be followed by a panel discussion featuring executives from the top companies in New Mexico’s energy landscape. Moderated by Albuquerque Business First Publisher Candace Beeke, the panel will be driven by audience questions.

    Panelists include:

    • Dr. Daniel Fine, associate director, Center for Energy Policy
    • ConocoPhillips senior executive
    • Ron Darnell, senior vice president of public policy, PNM Resources
    • Regina Wheeler, CEO, Positive Energy Solar

    Session highlights include:

    • The OPEC price war and how it impacts NM
    • The price cycle for oil, natural gas and others, and outlook for prices
    • Production capacity – where it is rising, where it is falling
    • Outlook for employment in energy trades
    • Impact of and future for renewable energy in NM
    • Opportunities and challenges for the energy sector in NM as a whole
    • How the energy sector will shape the broader economy

    Daniel_Fine_Associate_Director_Center_for_Energy_Policy

    Keynote speaker:

    Dr. Daniel Fine
    Associate Director
    Center for Energy Policy

    New Mexico Tech

    Dr. Daniel Fine is the Associate Director of the New Mexico Center for Energy Policy and is a Senior Policy Analyst in the New Mexico State Department of Energy Minerals and Natural Resources.

    He is a long time research associate at the Mining and Minerals Resources Institute (MIT). Fine is also a policy adviser on nonconventional oil and gas. He is co-editor of Resource War in 3-D: Dependence, Diplomacy and Defence, has contributed to Business Week, the Engineering and Mining Journal and the Washington Times. He has given testimony on strategic natural resources before the U.S. Senate Committees on Foreign Affairs and Energy and Natural Resources.

    ABOUT NEW MEXICO CENTER FOR ENERGY POLICY
    The New Mexico Center for Energy Policy (NMCEP) is the first community-centered response to the challenge of national energy security in the United States. Its location in Lea County reflects the New Mexico Southeast as a historic and contemporary source of energy production and technology. Energy policy-making in Washington and in state capitals is often limited to “witness” appearances from “locals”. Energy policy developed and promoted by an energy production community has been non-existent until now.

    Registration & Networking  | 7:30AM
    Breakfast and Program | 8:00AM – 9:30AM

    Sandia Resort & Casino has overnight accommodations at a reduced group rate of $159 until October 11, 2015. RESERVE OVERNIGHT ROOMS HERE.

Governor’s energy plan sets up New Mexico for new opportunities by Ripon Advance News Service


Governor’s energy plan sets up New Mexico for new opportunities by Ripon Advance News Service | Friday, Sep 25, 2015 @ 2:57pm For a link to the plan and the full article –> https://lnkd.in/e4mVTVk

New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez recently announced a sweeping, statewide energy plan aimed at embracing a wide array of energy sources, including oil and gas — which already accounts for more than $1 billion in yearly state revenues — solar, wind and new technologies. The far-reaching energy policy and implementation plan

entitled “Seizing our Energy Potential: Creating a More Diverse Economy in New Mexico,” is the state’s “first comprehensive energy policy and plan since 1991, nearly 25 years ago,” Michael Lonergan, Martinez’s press secretary, told Ripon Advance.

The plan put forth by Martinez, who is the nation’s first female Hispanic governor, calls for “an ‘all-of-the-above’ approach to energy development that promotes production from all sources” in order to create jobs, diversify a key sector of New Mexico’s economy and support the nation’s efforts to achieve energy independence, among other goals, Lonergan said this week.

Lonergan told Ripon Advance that the key components and initiatives of the plan include: improving New Mexico’s energy infrastructure; promoting greater production of all sources of energy; improving energy workforce training in the state’s higher education system; reducing freshwater consumption in production; streamlining regulatory processes; and exploring and potentially seizing on new energy opportunities.

Improving the state’s energy infrastructure, for example, will include new rail lines to improved electric transmission that will allow New Mexico to better move its energy and its products to markets in the Southwest and Southeast United States, as well as into Mexico and other markets.

In particular, rail from the Four Corners region to Interstate 40 would reduce the cost of transporting coal, crude oil and agricultural and other non-energy products from northwest New Mexico to markets throughout the state and beyond. Such improvements also would allow materials for energy production to be brought into New Mexico at a lower cost to producers.

In a statement unveiling her statewide energy plan earlier this month, Martinez called New Mexico “one of the most energy-rich and energy-diverse states in the nation.”

Editorial: Governor’s energy plan is excellent future blueprint


New Mexico has a wealth of energy resources. And now it has a comprehensive plan to help guide development of those riches to grow the state’s economy.

Last week at the 2015 Southeastern New Mexico Mayor’s Energy Summit in Carlsbad, Gov. Susana Martinez laid out a broad “all of the above” energy policy. “There is no reason we shouldn’t be an energy leader,” she later told attendees at the eighth annual Domenici Public Policy Conference in Las Cruces.

Her plan embraces a wide range of energy sources, ranging from oil and gas to solar, wind and up-and-coming technologies, such as “small modular reactors,” which must still be approved by the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

While the oil and gas industry has been – and still is – the backbone of the state’s energy economy (accounting for more than a billion dollars in revenues to the state each year), it’s clear there is plenty of opportunity for the growing renewable energy sector given New Mexico’s abundant sunshine, miles of windswept open spaces and nuclear experience and expertise.

One of the keys is development of more infrastructure – electricity transmission lines to move power generated by wind and solar, and new refineries and improved roads, rail and pipelines to transport resources in and out of the energy-producing areas in the southeastern and northwestern parts of the state.

It also proposes deployment of new battery storage technologies and exporting coal as utilities start using less of that resource as a result of agreements with the federal government to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve air quality.

Energy expert Daniel Fine discusses impact of falling global oil prices John Locke Foundation (video)


Published on Aug 21, 2015 Please Share!

Dr. Daniel Fine, associate director of the New Mexico Center for Energy Policy, discusses the impact of falling oil prices on the domestic energy industry. Fine offered these comments during an interview for Carolina Journal Radio (CarolinaJournalRadio.com) Program No. 640. Video courtesy of CarolinaJournal.tv.

Energy expert Dr. Daniel Fine says oil price war threatens N.C. and Atlantic offshore drilling


Dr. Daniel Fine, associate director of the New Mexico Center for Energy Policy and policy lead for the New New Mexico Energy Policy, explains how an oil price war led by Saudi Arabia impacts the prospects for drilling off the N.C. coast. Fine offered these comments during a May 21, 2015, speech to the John Locke Foundation’s Shaftesbury Society. Video courtesy of CarolinaJournal.tv. Access full-length videos of JLF presentations here:

New Mexico Tech Hosts first of its kind forum on Induced Seismicity


New Mexico Tech is hosting a first-of-its-kind workshop that will address the relationship between petroleum drilling and earthquakes, or “induced seismicity.”

The event will feature a series of guest speakers and will be August 21, 2014 in Fidel Center Ballroom on campus in Socorro. The event starts at 9 a.m., with three speakers in the morning and four speakers after lunch.

Over the past few decades, scientists have been examining the relationship between oil exploration – specifically hydraulic fracturing (or fracking) and horizontal drilling – and the increasing number of small earthquakes in the same areas. Several studies have examined the timing and location of seismic activity in Arkansas, Ohio, New Mexico and other states.

“A growing number of Earth scientists are looking at the relationship between oil exploration and seismic activity,” said Dr. Van Romero, Vice President of Research at New Mexico Tech. “With this workshop, we hope to place New Mexico Tech researchers at the forefront of the discussions about the topic.”

Romero will open the day-long event with a welcome to all participants. Hydrology professor Dr. Mark Person of New Mexico Tech is coordinating the event.

He said, “This is becoming a more important topic in recent years due to the large volumes of produced saline water that must be re-injected into deep subsurface reservoirs. If we can get a firm handle on the mechanisms controlling seismicity associated with saline water disposal practices, hopefully we can come up with some practical suggestions for best management practices.”

Guest speakers include the following:

Dr. Mark Person, New Mexico Tech – “Induced Seismicity events in the Midcontinent U.S.A.”
Dr. David Dempsey and Dr. Sharad Kelkar, Los Alamos National Lab, “Couple Geomechanical Hydrologic Models”
Dr. Andrew Delorey, Los Alamos National Lab, “Probing the Critical Stress State In Reservoirs”
Dr. Sue Bilek, New Mexico Tech, “Seismic Monitoring of Induced Seismic Events”
Dr. Sutin Holland and Dr. Randy Keller, Oklahoma Geological Survey, “Oklahoma Seismicity and Potential Cases of Induced Seismicity”
Dr. Reid Grigg and Dr. Bob Balch, New Mexico Tech, “Induced Seismicity in Paradise Valley, Utah”
Dr. Peter Mozley, New Mexico Tech, “Field Observations of Sedimentary and Crystalline Basement Fault Permeability”
The workshop is free and open to the public. To register, please email Gina Chavez at gchavez@admin.nmt.edu.

– NMT –

By Thomas Guengerich/New Mexico Tech

Link

No end in sight for NM’s oil boom


No end in sight for NM’s oil boom

A pumpjack operates near Carlsbad. New Mexico's oil production jumped 17 percent in 2013, with more growth projected this year. (Courtesy of NMOGA)

Copyright © 2014 Albuquerque Journal

The oil boom in southeast New Mexico just keeps growing, and there’s no end in sight.

Oil production jumped by another 17 percent in 2013, according to the latest statistics from the state Oil Conservation Division. That puts New Mexico production back to 1973 levels.

And, this year, experts project another 18 to 20 percent increase.

“Déjà vu,” said Daniel Fine, associate director of the Center for Energy Policy at the New Mexico Institute for Mining and Technology in Socorro. “We’re now back in the early 1970s, which was a period of energy self-sufficiency and independence. It’s a remarkable energy revolution.”

Output reached 99.1 million barrels last year, up from 85.1 million in 2012 and 71.3 million the year before. That represents two straight years of double-digit growth that has pushed production up 39 percent since 2011.

a01_jd_10may_oilOverall, oil output has grown 67 percent since 2008, when the state first began to reverse a three-decade decline that had begun in the early 1970s.

This year, the Center for Energy Policy expects production to expand to between 117 and 119 million barrels.

“We’re at about 270,000 barrels per day now, but we project that to reach between 320,000 and 325,000 per day in 2014,” Fine said. “That would give us the equivalent of about two-thirds of all the oil production in Alaska. In just a few years, we’ll be back at our all-time peak of 129 million barrels, which was achieved in 1969.”

The industry’s newfound fortune comes from modern drilling techniques, including three-dimensional imaging to pinpoint pools of oil and natural gas that producers ignored in the past, hydraulic fracturing to bust open extremely tough shale rock formations and horizontal drilling to push sideways into hydrocarbon deposits.

Those techniques have opened up vast new oil and gas plays around the country, while giving new life to aging basins, such as the Permian in West Texas and Southeast New Mexico, where production originally dates back to the 1920s.

Horizontal drilling in particular has allowed producers to slice into layers of shale bed, where huge pockets of liquids and dry gas are trapped.

“That’s made a huge difference,” said New Mexico Tech geologist Ron Broadhead. “More than half the active wells in New Mexico have been drilled horizontally. About 40 percent of the state’s production is due to that.”

Thanks to the new technologies, the Permian Basin is now estimated to contain some of the largest underground deposits of oil in the world, Fine said.

That’s good news for New Mexico, where royalties and taxes on oil and gas production account for about 31 percent of the state’s general budget, according to a new study released in January by the New Mexico Tax Research Institute. Last year, that amounted to $1.7 billion of the state’s $5.5 billion general fund.

Still, sustaining industry momentum depends on a number of things, especially adequate infrastructure. Road repair, construction of new pipelines and refineries, and more housing for workers are all critical.

“Oil production in New Mexico is no longer a drilling issue;it’s a matter of infrastructure development,” Fine said. “We need to work on that or it will begin to affect production.” For the complete story use this link–> http://www.abqjournal.com/397859/news/no-end-in-sight-for-nms-oil-boom.html

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