Analysis by the father of American Geopolitics Dr. Daniel Fine, MIT.

Posts tagged ‘Teaparty’

The John Locke Foundation presents The GeoPolitics of Oil Price-Resource War with oil and gas expert Dr. Daniel Fine RSVP NOW!


The John Locke Foundation presents

The Geopolitics of Oil Price-Resource War

In this presentation, Dr. Fine will discuss Saudi Arabian market share strategy and its threat to U.S. higher-cost shale oil. He will review how it began, the impact on new capital expenditure and drilling, how American technology is fighting back, and the impact on the Western states.

About Dr. Fine
Dr. Daniel Fine is the Associate Director of the New Mexico Center for Energy Policy and is a Senior Policy Analyst in the New Mexico State Department of Energy Minerals and Natural Resources. He has given testimony on strategic natural resources before the U.S. Senate Committees on Foreign Affairs and Energy and Natural Resources. Dr. Fine is co-editor of Resource War in 3-D: Dependence, Diplomacy and Defense, and has contributed to Business Week, the Engineering and Mining Journal, The Washington Times and the Energy Magazine/Daily Times, Farmington, New Mexico. Dr. Fine participated in the Atlantic Council Workshop on Central Asian Energy Policy and the Hudson Institute Russia-United States Relations Project (Oil and Gas). He was a member of the Director’s Advisory Board of the South Carolina Research Authority and a Research Associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Energy and Materials). He was also a contributor to the Harvard University Business School Study on Energy Futures.

Shaftesbury Luncheon talks are free and open to the public. An optional lunch is available for purchase at the event, or participants may brown bag a lunch if they choose.


Purchase Tickets for this Event Online -> http://www.johnlocke.org/events/event.html?id=1035

Advertisements

Potential Bounty for North Carolina


By Dr. Daniel I. Fine

Nearly 40 years ago, when the first oil price shock from the Middle East and OPEC disrupted the American economy, North Carolina and Appalachia briefly became an oil and gas frontier. Following geological investigations, Chevron drilled an exploratory well in the Deep River Basin beneath Lee County, N.C. Oil was discovered at 5,000 feet, but it contained excessive paraffin and Chevron plugged the well.

It remains there today as a new natural gas and oil technology has emerged: the capability of opening tight rock formations or shale through hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling.

Why is North Carolina not yet a site for drilling rigs, mud and service companies? Why is there shale gas exploration and production in the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania and West Virginia, and on different rock formations in Arkansas, Texas and in the Rocky Mountains?

The answer is political.

Tag Cloud