Analysis by the father of American Geopolitics Dr. Daniel Fine, MIT.

Posts tagged ‘Tulsa’

Our View: Limiting oil imports would help to protect American producers


By A-J Editorial Board

The full article is here-> http://lubbockonline.com/filed-online/2016-04-28/our-view-limiting-oil-imports-would-help-protect-american-producers#.Vyf6UPkrLIU

“When the price of oil drops, so does the cost of gasoline. But while people are enjoying paying lower prices at gasoline pumps, plunges in oil prices can cause economic damage in Texas.

And it can put American oil producers out of business when the price of foreign oil imports gets cheaper than the costs of extracting oil from the ground in the U.S.

Oil producers in the Panhandle recently announced the Panhandle Import Reduction Initiative. Their hope is to limit the amount of oil that can be imported from other countries.

We wish them success in getting sympathetic ears to hear their initiative and gathering like-minded people to help further it.

They are right that a limitation should be set on the amount of oil imports from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries.

Representatives of OPEC’s 18 nations recently met in Doha, Qatar. Among their topics of discussion was whether to freeze oil production levels.

The nations didn’t reach an agreement on the subject.

“OPEC and Russia and various countries met and decided they weren’t going to freeze oil and, in fact, OPEC said they will increase production again. This will drive the price down to $26 (a barrel) again,” said oil producer Tom Cambridge.”

This is what an oil bust looks like by Jonathan Thompson


Low prices have energy companies and communities reeling as rig counts plummet and unemployment climbs.

The full article is here-> http://www.hcn.org/articles/this-is-what-an-oil-bust-looks-like

“In early March, Daniel Fine, associate director of the New Mexico Center for Energy Policy, told a gathering of tribal energy officials that the oil bust is officially on. Those gathered, however, sure as heck didn’t need an expert to tell them that. In the oil and gas patches it has become clear that the economic gains of the so-called shale revolution are being wiped away by one of the worst fossil fuel downturns in U.S. history.

Now, the oil companies are crying for help. First, they got the crude oil export ban lifted. Next they want proposed federal rules on methane emissions weakened or scrapped. As if any of that will help.

Back in 2010, the price of a barrel of Brent crude (the international oil price benchmark) topped $80. That made it profitable to extract oil from tight shale formations, which is especially costly. A drilling frenzy ensued, domestic oil production skyrocketed, oil companies raked in profits and oil patch communities prospered.

But all that new oil on the market, plus China’s slowing economic growth, began to dampen oil prices in the summer of 2014. Instead of curtailing production to keep prices afloat, OPEC’s leaders launched a thinly veiled price war, clearly aimed at putting U.S. producers out of business. Here are some indicators that OPEC won the war:

The U.S. rig count has collapsed to levels not seen since, well, ever. With both oil and natural gas prices at near-record lows, it simply doesn’t make economic sense to spend up to $10 million to drill a well. So the rigs are shutting down. In September 2014, 1,931 oil and gas rigs were operating in the U.S.; today there are just 476. That’s a 75 percent decrease, and it’s still some 50 percent lower than the 1987 count, which followed what was considered the biggest, baddest bust ever, until now. Tom Dugan, who runs an oil and gas production company in northwest New Mexico, told the Farmington Daily Times, “It’s the hardest bust I’ve been through and I have been in this business for 57 years.”

New Mexico Tech Hosts first of its kind forum on Induced Seismicity


New Mexico Tech is hosting a first-of-its-kind workshop that will address the relationship between petroleum drilling and earthquakes, or “induced seismicity.”

The event will feature a series of guest speakers and will be August 21, 2014 in Fidel Center Ballroom on campus in Socorro. The event starts at 9 a.m., with three speakers in the morning and four speakers after lunch.

Over the past few decades, scientists have been examining the relationship between oil exploration – specifically hydraulic fracturing (or fracking) and horizontal drilling – and the increasing number of small earthquakes in the same areas. Several studies have examined the timing and location of seismic activity in Arkansas, Ohio, New Mexico and other states.

“A growing number of Earth scientists are looking at the relationship between oil exploration and seismic activity,” said Dr. Van Romero, Vice President of Research at New Mexico Tech. “With this workshop, we hope to place New Mexico Tech researchers at the forefront of the discussions about the topic.”

Romero will open the day-long event with a welcome to all participants. Hydrology professor Dr. Mark Person of New Mexico Tech is coordinating the event.

He said, “This is becoming a more important topic in recent years due to the large volumes of produced saline water that must be re-injected into deep subsurface reservoirs. If we can get a firm handle on the mechanisms controlling seismicity associated with saline water disposal practices, hopefully we can come up with some practical suggestions for best management practices.”

Guest speakers include the following:

Dr. Mark Person, New Mexico Tech – “Induced Seismicity events in the Midcontinent U.S.A.”
Dr. David Dempsey and Dr. Sharad Kelkar, Los Alamos National Lab, “Couple Geomechanical Hydrologic Models”
Dr. Andrew Delorey, Los Alamos National Lab, “Probing the Critical Stress State In Reservoirs”
Dr. Sue Bilek, New Mexico Tech, “Seismic Monitoring of Induced Seismic Events”
Dr. Sutin Holland and Dr. Randy Keller, Oklahoma Geological Survey, “Oklahoma Seismicity and Potential Cases of Induced Seismicity”
Dr. Reid Grigg and Dr. Bob Balch, New Mexico Tech, “Induced Seismicity in Paradise Valley, Utah”
Dr. Peter Mozley, New Mexico Tech, “Field Observations of Sedimentary and Crystalline Basement Fault Permeability”
The workshop is free and open to the public. To register, please email Gina Chavez at gchavez@admin.nmt.edu.

– NMT –

By Thomas Guengerich/New Mexico Tech

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