Analysis by the father of American Geopolitics Dr. Daniel Fine, MIT.

Posts tagged ‘Eagleford’

Oil leaders: OPEC threatening U.S. economy and New Mexico’s lifeblood; Nation has lost 400,000 oil and gas jobs in past two years


The full article is here-> http://rdrnews.com/wordpress/blog/2016/10/08/oil-leaders-opec-threatening-u-s-economy-and-new-mexicos-lifeblood-nation-has-lost-400000-oil-and-gas-jobs-in-past-two-years/

Dan Fine, an oil economist with the New Mexico Center for Energy Policy, speaks at a conference in Carlsbad recently about how foreign oil imports are hurting the American oil industry. Fine said OPEC has flooded the U.S. market with foreign oil since 2014 in an intentional effort to put U.S. producers out of business, while Saudi Arabian-backed companies are trying to buy American companies in an effort to control the flow of oil within U.S. borders. (Hobbs News-Sun Photo)

CARLSBAD — Oil experts say America is under attack by Saudi Arabia and OPEC, but instead of bombs, the OPEC oil cartel is dropping millions of barrels of oil on the U.S. economy in a clear effort to undermine the nation’s oil producers and kill any chance of American energy independence.
The first to feel the flood of foreign oil into the U.S. are the independent oil producers, whose stripper wells in Texas alone account for 20 percent of the nation’s oil and gas production, said Judy Stark, executive vice president of the The Panhandle Producers & Royalty Owners Association.
Stark was one of the half dozen speakers at an event of 25 people Sept. 27 in Carlsbad where the Panhandle Import Reduction Initiative, a group of independents seeking import quotas on foreign oil, met to announce their “white paper” that will be presented to the next president.
“We know OPEC has toyed with our market for many years but what I see coming now is a threat, without a doubt, to our national security,” Stark said. “The Middle East wants control of the U.S. market. When they came out and decided to flood the market with oil and drive U.S. producers out of business, their whole point was to take back their lost market share — our production. They are telling us is they are not going to let us produce our own natural resources. Guess what? They have done a pretty good job.”
The Sept. 27 Carlsbad meeting was a first battle cry that Dan Fine, a co-founder of the initiative and oil economist with the New Mexico Center for Energy Policy, said won’t be taken up by the nation for two years — when the rest of the country wakes up and finds it is too late to stop OPEC from controlling America’s energy industry.
“We are pioneers,” Fine said. “My point is, we are sitting here today 18 months to two years ahead of everyone. Sometime in early 2018, the country will discover what we are having a discussion about here today.”

What’s at stake?

What’s at stake is some 276 billion barrels of oil reserves now estimated to exist in the United States.
According to Fine, that number surpasses what Saudi Arabia has and they are terrified. Fine quoted Harold Hamm, CEO of Continental Resources, concerning the shale oil discoveries made in the United States.
“The United States has increased oil production by an enormous 65 percent over the past five years,” Fine said, quoting Hamm’s statement. “We can and should use our nearly unlimited oil and gas supplies to drive a stake through the heart of OPEC forever.”

Our View: Limiting oil imports would help to protect American producers


By A-J Editorial Board

The full article is here-> http://lubbockonline.com/filed-online/2016-04-28/our-view-limiting-oil-imports-would-help-protect-american-producers#.Vyf6UPkrLIU

“When the price of oil drops, so does the cost of gasoline. But while people are enjoying paying lower prices at gasoline pumps, plunges in oil prices can cause economic damage in Texas.

And it can put American oil producers out of business when the price of foreign oil imports gets cheaper than the costs of extracting oil from the ground in the U.S.

Oil producers in the Panhandle recently announced the Panhandle Import Reduction Initiative. Their hope is to limit the amount of oil that can be imported from other countries.

We wish them success in getting sympathetic ears to hear their initiative and gathering like-minded people to help further it.

They are right that a limitation should be set on the amount of oil imports from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries.

Representatives of OPEC’s 18 nations recently met in Doha, Qatar. Among their topics of discussion was whether to freeze oil production levels.

The nations didn’t reach an agreement on the subject.

“OPEC and Russia and various countries met and decided they weren’t going to freeze oil and, in fact, OPEC said they will increase production again. This will drive the price down to $26 (a barrel) again,” said oil producer Tom Cambridge.”

Amarillo to host PPROA event ; Leading energy expert Dr. Daniel Fine to deliver breaking news keynote


Amarillo to host PPROA event

Posted: September 4, 2015 – 11:19pm  |  Updated: September 7, 2015 – 10:25pm
Back | Next

Kel Seliger: Texas state senator, R-Amarillo.

Kel Seliger: Texas state senator, R-Amarillo.

A New Mexico energy policy expert will headline the 86th annual gathering of Panhandle Producers and Royalty Owners Association.

The event will take place Sept. 22 to 24, with sessions at Amarillo Civic Center Complex and events at the Cactus Gun Club and Ross Rogers Municipal Golf Course.

PPROA serves as an advocate for oil and gas producers, mineral royalty owners and industry support companies in the Texas Panhandle, western Oklahoma and southwestern Kansas.

Dr. Daniel I. Fine, associate director of the New Mexico Center for Energy Policy, a research arm of New Mexico Tech, and Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush will be featured speakers on Sept. 23.

Fine is a senior policy analyst in the New Mexico State House and his resume includes stints as a policy advisor on nonconventional oil and gas in the administration of President George W. Bush and as a research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Mining and Minerals Resources Institute.

“I’m going to make a special announcement about a policy recommendation that could change the supply and demand for oil dramatically to benefit southwest U.S. producers,” Fine said Friday.

“Let me just say that (much), and I’m reserving that for Amarillo.”

Fine said the information he will release is set against the backdrop of the “open price war against southwest and U.S. shale (oil) production. I’m going to break it down in terms of the history of the price war, the objectives of Saudi Arabia, and the current condition of world oversupply.”

The talk also will cover policy issues involved in the current situation, as well as contain his analysis of the consequences of the proposed nonnuclear proliferation treaty between the United States and Iran and “the re-entry of Iran in the world oil market and its impact on price and U.S. production,” Fine said.

The schedule for Sept. 23 will include a keynote luncheon speech by Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush.

A forum is also planned featuring state Sen. Kel Seliger (R-
Amarillo), state Reps. Four Price (R-Amarillo) and Ken King (R-Canadian), Texas Railroad Commissioner Ryan Sitton, Texas Alliance of Energy Producers Chief Counsel Gloria Leal, and Texas energy advocate Luke Legate, a PPROA news release said.

The convention will open on Sept. 22, with sessions about the battle for minerals and surface rights in the Texas Supreme Court by Houston lawyer John B. Thomas and a “WOTUS or Bogus” presentation from speaker John Tintera about the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Waters of the United States rules.

Tinterra is former executive director of the Railroad Commission of Texas, a regulatory expert and licensed geologist.

The Sept. 24 activity is a golf tournament at the Ross Rogers course.

PPROA has about 640 members and its conventions regularly draw 200 to 300 participants, Executive Vice President Judy Stark said.

For a convention schedule and registration details, visit www
.pproa.org or call the association office at 806-352-5637.

Column: International production means oil prices likely to remain low By Daniel Fine


For the complete article use this link–> http://www.daily-times.com/farmington-opinion/ci_28613365/column-international-production-means-oil-prices-likely-remain “The price of West Texas Crude oil has declined below $50 per barrel as a reaction to the expectation that oil export sanctions against Iran will be lifted within the framework of the multi-nation “deal” to slow the country’s progress toward developing nuclear weapons. The global market is oversupplied and Saudi Arabian production is approaching its highest level since the 1970s.

San Juan and Delaware basin oil producers have sharply reduced costs through efficiencies. American higher-cost production shows no sign of a decline while OPEC lower-cost production increases in spite of lower prices. Saudi Arabia has decided to fight the Americans for market share.

The outlook for Iraq places still more production in the global market. Iraq production, now at 4 million barrels per day and rising, could reach 6 million in two years. The Iranian Oil Company could attract BP and Total to invest capital and technology if sanctions permit. This would drive Iranian production to equal Iraq. In the short-term Iran has the capability of expanding exports by 1.2 million barrels.

Should the “deal” fail or be changed by Congress to a phase-in of Iranian oil exports over a longer period of time and the White House goes along, the price of oil should recover to $60 per barrel. This is a long-shot scenario, however.

There will be more Middle East production for export than anticipated and its impact on American shale oil production will be a three-year, low-price oil regime. On the other hand, the current price war is moving quietly to an old variable. From 2009 to early last year, Saudi Arabia and the Gulf States assumed that American shale technology (horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing) was unsustainable. They changed course last year and resorted to the price war for market share.

The reason for this change in strategy was first, the decline ratio of shale horizontal wells; and second, the regulatory obstacles. Simply put, OPEC perceived the environmental/global warming/climate change political group mobilization as capable of winning tighter federal regulations that would cause higher costs to the oil industry stopping the “technology play.”

OPEC now regards the appearance of new methane rules as a revival of its earlier “unsustainable” scenario. Methane mitigation regulations can setback natural gas production but also the associated gas from oil production. San Juan Basin oil producing formations are heavy in associated gas. If methane emissions, leaks or flaring persist, OPEC calculates, it will cause regulatory intervention as part of the new International Treaty on Global Warming.”

Tag Cloud